Around Town With Lou: Jan. 18-25

0
1770

Editor’s Note: Lou Sanders, who has his journalism degree from NYU, and his late wife, Grace, a graduate of Adelphi, founded the Mineola American in 1952, giving the village its first successful newspaper. Lou and Grace lived in Mineola for 60 years, and his popular column is a signature feature of this paper.

Donna Burke of Beebe Road tells me her son, Ryan, is in the eighth grade at the Bishop Kellenberg Latin School. Ryan, who is a great athlete, plays baseball, basketball and football. This top student is now trying to decide where he will go to high school.

• • • •

I had lunch the other day with Fr. Lawrence O’Leary, the chaplain here at Maria Regina Residence. Like me, he was a big New York Giants fan. We reminisced about Monsignor Edmund Fitzgerald, who served years ago as pastor at Corpus Christi Church. Fr. O’Leary also knows Corpus Christi’s current pastor, Fr. Malcolm Burns.

• • • •

Olga O’Keefe has worked at Alpha Collision on Herricks Road for 14 years. The company belongs to Tony and Vinnie.

• • • •

Mary Ann and Nugent Cantelino have lived on Beebe Road for 58 years. They are faithful members of Corpus Christi Church and they like their new pastor, Fr. Burns.

• • • •

Veronica Ward has worked at Cugini’s Italian Restaurant for the past year. Cugini’s is a very popular eatery run by Joe and Regina Cugini.

• • • •

Davenport Press had a great Christmas Eve during which they served almost 400 dinners. They also had a very successful New Year’s Eve with more than 400 dinners, according Dennis Labertos and Lino Farreia.

• • • •

Billy Delvanthal, who for many years was the general manager at Anton Newspapers, now has a business that provides paper-shredding services for large corporations.

• • • •

Jack and Karen Gayson had a great Christmas celebrating with their four children and eight grandchildren. The Gaysons live on Mineola Boulevard and are the owners of one of the largest heating and plumbing companies on Long Island.

• • • •

Mary Ann Guarino is finally home and able to drive after an unbelievable series of medical mishaps.

• • • •

The Sisters of St. Joseph of Brentwood sponsored a bus to the Women’s March on Washington, the day after the inauguration.

• • • •

Victoria, who was the queen of England, for more than 50 years, was so eccentric that instead of calling her our Beloved Queen, the English people began to call her our Queer Old Dean.

• • • •

Bob and Pat Hinck celebrated New Year’s Eve with their four children and 11 grandchildren, including their son, Kevin and his wife, Phayra, who live in Garden City.

• • • •

A couple of hundred years ago, the skies over Britain and Ireland were filled with a bird called a kite. These were beautiful birds that would swoop down and grab their prey. Hence, came the name kite for the materials that we send up on a string to swoop and fly in the air.

• • • •

In Arab countries long ago, people would play a game with a net and a ball. They would strike the ball with the bear palm of their hands. There were no other rules for getting the ball over the net nor for the other person hitting it back. After racquets were invented for this game, it was decided that boundaries were needed. Hence they drew a line around the playing field. Thus, comes our expression “to draw a line,” meaning to put limits on something.

SHARE
Previous articleYoung Yogis
Next articleA Note From The Publisher
Betsy Abraham is the former senior managing editor at Anton Media Group and editor of The Westbury Times and Massapequa Observer. She also wrote for Long Island Weekly.

Leave a Reply